With ‘Fabric,’ Twitter Aims to Win Back Developers

Twitter is preparing a push to mend fences with app developers, with the hopes of embedding itself into more mobile apps and collecting deeper data on mobile users.

The company plans to unveil a new app development platform called “Twitter Fabric” that contains tools for developers to help people sign up for their apps more easily, sell ads on them, uncover technical glitches and view other analytics. Fabric would propel Twitter into deeper competition with Facebook, Amazon and Google, all of whom have taken steps to plug their systems deeper into everyday interactions on mobile devices.

If successful, the previously undisclosed project could help Twitter boost its nascent ad-network revenue stream, gain a new source of revenue, and hook more users into its own app. It also reflects Twitter’s desire to be at the center of online “identity.” Twitter and its competitors are in an arms race to collect more data about people’s activities and interests across different mobile applications, which could let them broker more expensive ads or build better products.

No subscription? You’re missing out.
Join the high-powered community of tech and business leaders who rely on The Information’s original news and in-depth reporting.
Subscribe to read the remaining 994 words of this article.
What’s included in a subscription?
Read The Information’s original, in-depth reporting and analysis
Receive as-they-happen articles via email
Talk with award-winning reporters in subscriber-only conference calls
Join the conversation on our subscriber-only Slack channel
Attend intimate, high-powered events with leaders in tech and business
Subscribe to The Information

There are also “vertical” tools that help app developers solve specific problems, such as offering payments (Stripe), voice communications (Twilio), analytics (Twitter’s Crashlytics) and selling ads (Yahoo’s recently-acquired Flurry).

Rod Drury and Amir Efrati commented on this article.
Read comments from top tech and industry leaders
Joe Lonsdale
Joe Lonsdale
Founding Partner, Eight
Chamath Palihapitiya
Chamath Palihapitiya
Founder & Managing Partner, SocialCapital
Tina Sharkey
Tina Sharkey
CEO, Brandless
Jonah Peretti
Jonah Peretti
CEO, Buzzfeed
Adam D'Angelo
Adam D'Angelo
CEO, Quora
Brit Morin
Brit Morin
Founder & CEO, Brit + CO
Dustin Moskovitz
Dustin Moskovitz
Co-Founder, Asana
Christina Miller
Christina Miller
President & General Manager, Turner
Max Levchin
Max Levchin
CEO, Affirm
Adam Mosseri
Adam Mosseri
Director of Product, Facebook
Alex Mather
Alex Mather
The Athletic
Martha Josephson
Martha Josephson
Partner, Egon Zehnder
James Murdoch
James Murdoch
Co-Chief Operating Officer, 21st Century Fox
Andrew Kortina
Andrew Kortina
Founder, Venmo
Ben Chestnut
Ben Chestnut
Co-Founder & CEO, Mailchimp
Ruchi Sanghvi
Ruchi Sanghvi
VP Operations, Dropbox
Login or Subscribe to follow the discussions happening here and real-time in our   Slack Community.
The project comes three years after the company made enemies among app developers by deciding to effectively shut down third-party “client” apps that relied on Twitter’s Tweet streams. That move took many by surprise, since Twitter had previously encouraged such projects.