Zach Perret, CEO and co-founder of Plaid, spoke during the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit in Salt Lake City last year. Photo: Bloomberg
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Plaid Shareholders Field Offers at $15 Billion After Merger Collapse

Photo: Zach Perret, CEO and co-founder of Plaid, spoke during the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit in Salt Lake City last year. Photo: Bloomberg

Normally CEOs that opt to sell their companies aren’t happy when the government blocks the deal over antitrust concerns. But that doesn’t appear to be the case with Plaid, a fintech startup that has seen a surge in investor interest since federal regulators blocked its merger last week with Visa.

So far, the prospective investors haven’t had any success acquiring shares in the startup, according to a person with direct knowledge of the matter. But Plaid is expected to seek new financing in the coming months, in a round that investors said could more than triple its valuation to approximately $15 billion. That’s also the price at which some existing investors have received offers recently to sell shares.

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