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Snap’s Head of Engineering to Step Down

By  |  Nov. 7, 2017 5:57 PM PST
Photo: Photo by Bloomberg

Snap’s vice president of engineering Tim Sehn is stepping down from the company, say people familiar with the matter. His departure is expected to be announced Wednesday when the company files details of its quarterly results with securities regulators.

Mr. Sehn has headed up the company’s engineering team since 2013, according to his LinkedIn profile. He will be replaced by Jerry Hunter, an engineer who now reports to Mr. Sehn, the people said. Mr. Sehn brought Mr. Hunter into Snap in 2016. The two had previously worked together at Amazon. Mr. Sehn couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.

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