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The Information’s Return to the Office Tracker: Winter 2021

For nearly two years, tech executives have wrestled with the question of whether and how to reopen their physical workspaces. Some were quick to declare that the age of the office was over, while others have gravitated toward a middle ground.

The biggest tech companies—including Apple, Microsoft and Meta Platforms, Facebook’s parent company—have largely reached a consensus on their view of the future for their workplaces: Most want workers to commute to their offices for at least half, if not more, of their working hours. Exactly when they will require employees to come back, though, is a moving target for some of them, as The Information reported earlier today.

Still, a second category of companies across tech—including Twitter, Shopify and Twilio—has embraced remote work with gusto. While some of them are keeping offices open for those who want to return, they say they won’t force employees who are content with remote work to give it up.

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