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Tobacco, Tech and Ulterior Motives

Last week, I was scrolling through Twitter when I was stopped by a headline. From snowy Davos, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff was telling CNBC that Facebook should be regulated like a tobacco company.

I wasn’t surprised by the analogy; I was surprised by who said it. I’ve been hearing that argument from the folks who run television news networks, newspapers and print magazines since last summer. These are the obvious enemies of Big Tech. And they also happen to understand the power of a good soundbite.

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But cigarettes cause cancer. Social media does not. I hope everyone is aware of the ulterior motives of those equating the two.

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Rahul Harkawat, Jessica E. Lessin and 3 others commented on this article.
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“Of all the things you could be compared to, cigarettes resonate the most widely. It’s probably the single most effective example of regulatory change.”